Give us a call +386 1 542 06 00

Razum

Get a proposal

Blog

During our work we always keep track of new persistence technologies cropping up so we can pick the most appropriate product for a given project. We’re big fans of PostgreSQL when it comes to classic SQL and we’ve been evaluating mongoDB in toy projects...

Simplifying data storage by Gregor

During our work we always keep track of new persistence technologies cropping up so we can pick the most appropriate product for a given project. We’re big fans of PostgreSQL when it comes to classic SQL and we’ve been evaluating mongoDB in toy projects - some of us are aching to give FoundationDB, Cassandra or even Parse a try, too. But sometimes a project’s requirements are so specific that all of the above seem either ill-suited or too complicated for the task at hand. Let me present a recent case we’ve had.

A mobile app needed to have its global configuration accessible for a large number of clients and none of its data was client-specific - for the price of a slightly larger configuration every client’s specific settings could be extracted from a single source. Our solution was to simply host the configuration hosted on Amazon S3 as a read-only JSON file. The client’s admin application was implemented as a single Dropwizard JAR that had write permissions for the S3 bucket so deployment was super simple - any server with Java installed would do. Fortunately the client didn’t need complex access rights management so storing usernames and bcrypted passwords in a configuration file was sufficient but storing those in a private S3 file would have been possible, too.

Nothing beats simple, right?

< Back to article list